Tag Archive: folate


 

 

 


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Heart Health

You hear in the news and on the commercials that heart disease is the #1 killer among women now. Why is it we are dying from heart disease and what can we do about it?

Do you really think that becel margarine is the answer? Margarine isn’t a real food, it is man made not natural. They say you can put in in the yard or in your garage and the mice or animals won’t even eat it. I read that it is one of the closest food to plastic we can get. Then there is the pink ribbon campaigns to help end heart disease. Can we really find the answer in another pill that most research money is going into?

I think the answer lies in what we put in our mouths. Vitamin C for instance is a heart protector that we don’t hear much about. The recommended daily allowance is so low it might keep us from getting scurvy but is it going to help with heart health? I don’t thinks so. There are so many things that deplete it and it is one vitamin that we have to keep replenishing in our bodies daily to keep us nutritionally healthy.

I think we are eating way too much of the wrong kind of fats, lack of nutrition from the right kinds of foods and stress. This world is full of stress and we need to slow down and start thinking about our health. After all if you don’t, no one is going to do it for you.

How do we get heart healthy?

  • acerola

  • antioxidants

  • apples

  • apricots

  • asparagus

  • avocado

  • barley

  • bananas

  • beans

  • beets

  • berries

  • beta carotene

  • blueberries

  • bread

  • broccoli

  • brown rice

  • buckwheat

  • bulgur

  • cantaloupe

  • carotenoids

  • carrots

  • cherries

  • chestnuts

  • chicken

  • cranberries

  • currants

  • fiber

  • figs

  • fish

  • flavonoids

  • flaxseed View full article »

Great studies that are thrown on the back burner.

PubMed

Food Chem Toxicol. 2002 Aug;40(8):1113-7.

Micronutrients and genomic stability: a new

paradigm for recommended dietary allowances

(RDAs).

Fenech M.

CSIRO Health Sciences and Nutrition, PO Box 10041, Gouger Street, BC, SA, 5000, Adelaide, Australia. michael.fenech@hsn.csiro.au

Abstract

Diet as a key factor in determining genomic stability is more important than previously imagined because we now know that it impacts on all relevant pathways, namely exposure to dietary carcinogens, activation/detoxification of carcinogens, DNA repair, DNA synthesis and apoptosis. Current recommended dietary allowances for vitamins and minerals are based largely on the prevention of diseases of deficiency such as scurvy in the case of vitamin C. Because diseases of development, degenerative disease and aging itself are partly caused by damage to DNA it seems logical that we should focus better our attention on defining optimal requirements of key minerals and vitamins for preventing damage to both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA. To date, our knowledge on optimal micronutrient levels for genomic stability is scanty and disorganised. However, there is already sufficient evidence to suggest that marginal deficiencies in folate, vitamin B12, niacin and zinc impact significantly on spontaneous chromosome damage rate. The recent data for folate and vitamin B12 in humans with respect to micronucleus formation in blood and epithelial cells provide compelling evidence of the important role of these micronutrients in maintenance of genome integrity and the need to revise current RDAs for these micronutrients based on minimisation of DNA damage. Appropriately designed in vitro studies and in vivo placebo controlled trials with dose responses using a complementary array of DNA damage biomarkers are required to define recommended dietary allowances for genomic stability. Furthermore these studies would have to be targeted to individuals with common genetic polymorphisms that alter the bioavailability of specific micronutrients and the affinity of specific key enzymes involved in DNA metabolism for their micronutrient co-factor. That there is a need for an international collaborative effort to establish RDAs for genomic stability is self-evident.

PMID: 12067572 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

Article from: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12067572