Category: Fibromyalgia Info


 



Welcome to Natural Pain Relief For Fibromyalgia


Hashimoto’s Disease

Last Chance to Save $30.00 on the Hashimoto’s Insitute Seminar –

28 Experts on One Topic

Are you suffering with Fibromyalgia, Thyroid disease or undiagnosed unbearable fatigue? These panel of experts might be able to help you.

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If you suffer with Fibromyalgia, you need to hear these recordings.

Are you suffering with Fibromyalgia? We can help.

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Get your free copy of Relieving Pain from Disease Naturally

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   Disclaimer: All content contained within this website
is not intended to treat, cure or diagnose in any way. All content is commentary
or opinion and is protected under the free speech act.

2010 to
Present – All Rights Reserved

 

 

Many Women and Men Suffering with Fibromyalgia are Actually Suffering With Thyroid Disorder and

About 70% of them Have Hashimoto’s

 

 

 

 

Are you suffering with Fibromyalgia? We can help.

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Get your copy of relieving pain

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Welcome to Natural Pain Relief For Fibromyalgia


Fibromyalgia Symptoms Eliminated From Discontinued Use Of
Aspartame & MSG

Fibromyalgia patients had complete or nearly complete resolution of their symptoms within months of eliminating Monosodium glutamate (MSG) or MSG plus aspartame from their diet.All had symptoms return whenever MSG was ingested. It certainly is worth a try to

Ann Pharmacother. 2001
Jun;35(6):702-6.

Relief of fibromyalgia symptoms following discontinuation of dietary excitotoxins.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Fibromyalgia is a common rheumatologic disorder that is often difficult to treat effectively.

CASE SUMMARY:

Four patients diagnosed with fibromyalgia syndrome for two to 17 years are described. All had undergone multiple treatment modalities with limited success. All had complete, or nearly complete, resolution of their symptoms within months after eliminating monosodium glutamate (MSG) or MSG plus aspartame from their diet. All patients were women with multiple comorbidities prior to elimination of MSG. All have had recurrence of symptoms whenever MSG is ingested.

DISCUSSION:

Excitotoxins are molecules, such as MSG and aspartate, that act as excitatory neurotransmitters, and can lead to neurotoxicity when used in excess. We propose that these four patients may represent a subset of fibromyalgia syndrome that is induced or exacerbated by excitotoxins or, alternatively, may comprise an excitotoxin syndrome that is similar to fibromyalgia. We suggest that
identification of similar patients and research with larger numbers of patients must be performed before definitive conclusions can be made.

CONCLUSIONS:

The elimination of MSG and other excitotoxins from the diets of patients with fibromyalgia offers a benign treatment option that has the potential for dramatic results in a subset of patients.

PMID: 
11408989 
[PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

Maybe I wasn’t so far off with my article:

Are you sure it’s Fibromyalgia?

http://naturalpainreliefforfibromyalgia.com/188

Are you suffering with Fibromyalgia? We can help.

http://naturalpainreliefforfibromyalgia.com

Get your copy of relieving pain

http://naturalpainreliefforfibromyalgia.com/1549

   Disclaimer: All content contained within this website
is not intended to treat, cure or diagnose in any way. All content is commentary
or opinion and is protected under the free speech act.

2010 to
Present – All Rights Reserved

 

 



Welcome to Natural Pain Relief For Fibromyalgia


Have you ever thought that
there was more to life than what you are living?


Do you feel that you are
stuck in a rut?


Do you desire to be all
that you can be?


You can!


Sometimes we need some
tools to help us be the best we can be!

Are you suffering with Fibromyalgia? We can help.

http://naturalpainreliefforfibromyalgia.com

Get your copy of relieving pain

http://naturalpainreliefforfibromyalgia.com/1549

I am an affiliate for for mind movies.

   Disclaimer: All content contained within this website
is not intended to treat, cure or diagnose in any way. All content is commentary
or opinion and is protected under the free speech act.

2010 to
Present – All Rights Reserved

 

 

 



Welcome to Natural Pain Relief For Fibromyalgia

Les Brown On Negative People
And The Power To Change!

You are who you think we are or have been told you are but it doesn’t necessarily have to be that way. You can change!

The power of the mind. If you think you will die of cancer, you probably will. Change your thoughts, change your life!

Make the change for a better life! Les Brown and the power to change! It’s all about YOU! This is very inspirational advice that 


Les Brown- Negative people

 


Les Brown – Take Charge of Your Life FULL

 


Les Brown – The Power To Change

 


STEP INTO YOUR GREATNESS BY LES BROWN

 


Les Brown – Relationships [Married, Single, and Divorced]

 

 

Suffering from Fibromyalgia? We can help, go get your free eBook on pain relief at:

http://naturalpainreliefforfibromyalgia.com/1549

The first steps towards living a better life with your Fibromyalgia.

   Disclaimer: All content contained within this website
is not intended to treat, cure or diagnose in any way. All content is commentary
or opinion and is protected under the free speech act.

2010 All
Rights Reserved

 

 

 



Welcome to Natural Pain Relief For Fibromyalgia

Fibromyalgia and Smoking

Ya, we all know smoking cigarettes is not good for us but how do we quit?

Cigarette

Cigarettes are not good for anyone but if you have a chronic illness like Fibromyalgia you are adding a major blow to your health. If you lead a sedentary life and smoke, you are inviting all kinds of disaster into your life.

When I saw the commercial of a surgeon slapping down a major artery and squishing the white, thick, gunk that had totally filled the major aorta to the heart of a dead 32 male, I changed the opinion of my passion for smoking. I will never forget that image and I don’t think they should have take the commercial off the air, talk about reality biting you in the ass! I searched the internet and found a similar commercial. See for yourself.


I quit with laser therapy, which worked for me but I am worried about the long term effects of the lasers as it is fairly new and something that was passed by the FDA?????????? How many drugs did they approve that ended in disaster. It is also very expensive but if done right, it can work..

Be careful as they are also passing off a lot of lasers that aren’t really intended to work for quitting smoking. Kind of like the fake Louis Vuitton, Prada and Coach purses. So if you decide to do laser, make sure it is reputable because you
will be wasting about $300.00 on a fake laser that will have you back smoking in no time.

The patches are full of chemicals as well as the cigarettes so are we just trading up addictions? More toxic drugs for the already sick body!

Zyban gave my husband serum sickness, his body swelled up and went toxic, nasty!! The drugs really aren’t the answer, they only add another possibility of addiction or side effects.

I know that quitting smoking is one of the hardest things to do, definitely in line with heroin and sugar. Whether it is drugs, cigarettes, alcohol or food, an addiction is an addictions. We are all human.

There are real options now!

The Health Ranger recommends 14andOut.com if you are looking to quit smoking. Shawn Cohen has found a way
to do it successfully and is helping thousands. It is also at an affordable price right now. It is regular $59.00 on sale at the time of this post for $39.00. How many packages of cigarettes would it take to pay for that? 

This is the most comprehensive smoking cessation program ever, and it only takes 60 minutes to learn.

What? 60 minutes? You are worth it! If I were still smoking, I would give this a try.

 

Why not give it a try?

What have you got to lose? Cigarettes, smelly breath/clothes/house/car, toxins, addiction, breathing difficulties, scrounging for money to buy cigarettes, risk of lung cancer, heart disease, bronchitis, emphysema, asthma or dying.

 

 

What have you got to gain? Your life, your health, money in your pocket, better health, keep smelling fresh and clean all day, no addiction or chain to drag you into a winter storm for a drag, fresh breath, breathing period and most of all, YOUR FREEDOM! I felt like I was chained to my pack of smokes.

I can tell you something else too, my friends who have stayed smoking have grey hair and I don’t. You also wrinkle up and age your body and skin a lot quicker so you really are giving up your youth and vitality to smoke.


http://premium.naturalnews.tv/14AndOut__TV.htm

Smoking is not the cause of your Fibromyalgia but it is not helping either. They really are a limiting belief, you tell yourself you can’t live without them because, believe me, you can life a far better life without them, change your thinking.

Consider your poor thyroid, brain and lungs and how many toxins you are giving them with every drag. Smokers lose teeth too!

Is your body and your pocket book worth the expense of smoking? I think you are worth the consideration of butting out.

What it comes down to is, you have to be ready. Good luck!

If you are suffering from Fibromyalgia, I can help.


http://naturalpainreliefforfibromyalgia.com/1549

   Disclaimer: All content contained within this website
is not intended to treat, cure or diagnose in any way. All content is commentary
or opinion and is protected under the free speech act.

2011 All
Rights Reserved

 

 



Welcome to Natural Pain Relief For Fibromyalgia

Autoimmune diseases fact sheet

What are autoimmune diseases?

Our bodies have an immune system, which is a complex network of special cells and organs that defends the body from germs and other foreign invaders. At the core of the immune system is the ability to tell the difference between self and nonself: what’s you and what’s foreign. A flaw can make the body unable to tell the difference between self and nonself. When this happens, the body makes autoantibodies (AW-toh-AN-teye-bah-deez) that attack normal cells by mistake. At the same time special cells called regulatory T cells fail to do their job of keeping the immune system in line. The result is a misguided attack on your own body. This causes the damage we know as autoimmune disease. The body parts that are affected depend on the type of autoimmune disease. There are more than 80 known types.

Body parts that can be affected by autoimmune diseases

How common are autoimmune diseases?

Overall, autoimmune diseases are common, affecting more than 23.5 million Americans. They are     a leading cause of death and disability. Yet some autoimmune diseases are rare, while others,     such as Hashimoto’s disease, affect many people.

Who gets autoimmune diseases?

Did you know?

Sponsored by the Office on Women’s Health, the Could I Have Lupus? Campaign raising awareness about lupus and providing a supportive online community for women coping with lupus symptoms.

Autoimmune diseases can affect anyone. Yet certain people are at greater risk,
including:

  • Women of childbearing age 
    More women than men have autoimmune diseases, which often start during their childbearing years.
  • People with a family history 
    Some autoimmune diseases run in families, such as lupus and multiple sclerosis. It is also common for different types of autoimmune diseases to affect different       members of a single family. Inheriting certain genes can make it more likely to get an             autoimmune disease. But a combination of genes and other factors may trigger the                disease to start.
  • People who are around certain things in the environment 
    Certain events or environmental exposures may cause some autoimmune diseases, or make them worse. Sunlight, chemicals called solvents, and viral and bacterial infections are
    linked to many autoimmune diseases.
  • People of certain races or ethnic backgrounds — Some autoimmune diseases are more common or more severely affect certain groups of people more than others.  For instance,  type 1 diabetes is more common in white people. Lupus is most severe for African-American and Hispanic people.

What autoimmune diseases affect women, and what are their symptoms?

The diseases listed here either are more common in women than men or affect many women and   men. They are listed in A-to-Z order. Although each disease is unique, many share hallmark symptoms, such as fatigue, dizziness, and low-grade fever. For many autoimmune diseases, symptoms come and go, or can be mild sometimes and severe at others. When symptoms go away for a while, it’s called remission. Flares are the sudden and severe onset of symptoms.

Types of autoimmune diseases and their symptoms

Disease

Symptoms

Alopecia areata (Al-uh-PEE-shuh AR-ee-AYT-uh)

The immune system attacks hair follicles (the structures from which hair grows). It usually does not threaten health, but it can greatly affect the way a person looks.

  • Patchy hair loss on the scalp, face, or other areas of your body

 

Antiphospholipid (an-teye-FOSS-foh-lip-ihd) antibody
syndrome (aPL)

A disease that causes problems in the inner lining of blood vessels resulting in blood clots in arteries or veins.

  • Blood clots in veins or arteries
  • Multiple miscarriages
  • Lacy, net-like red rash on the wrists and knees 

Autoimmune hepatitis

The immune system attacks and destroys the liver cells. This can lead to scarring and hardening of the liver, and possibly liver failure.

  • Fatigue
  • Enlarged liver
  • Yellowing of the skin or whites of eyes
  • Itchy skin
  • Joint pain
  • Stomach pain or upset

Celiac disease

A disease in which people can’t tolerate gluten, a substance found in wheat, rye, and barley, and also some medicines. When people with celiac disease eat foods or use products that have gluten, the immune system responds by damaging the lining of the small intestines.

  • Abdominal bloating and pain
  • Diarrhea or constipation
  • Weight loss or weight gain
  • Fatigue
  • Missed menstrual periods
  • Itchy skin rash
  • Infertility or miscarriages

Diabetes type 1

A disease in which your immune system attacks the cells that make insulin, a hormone needed to control blood sugar levels. As a result, your body cannot make insulin. Without insulin, too much sugar stays in your blood. Too high blood sugar can hurt the eyes, kidneys, nerves, and gums and teeth. But the most serious problem caused by diabetes is heart disease.

  • Being very thirsty
  • Urinating often
  • Feeling very hungry or tired
  • Losing weight without trying
  • Having sores that heal slowly
  • Dry, itchy skin
  • Losing the feeling in your feet or having tingling in your feet
  • Having blurry eyesight

Graves’ disease (overactive
thyroid)

A disease that causes the thyroid to make too much thyroid hormone.

  • Insomnia
  • Irritability
  • Weight loss
  • Heat sensitivity
  • Sweating
  • Fine brittle hair
  • Muscle weakness
  • Light menstrual periods
  • Bulging eyes
  • Shaky hands
  • Sometimes there are no symptoms

Guillain-Barre (GEE-yahn bah-RAY) syndrome

The immune system attacks the nerves that connect your brain and spinal cord with the rest of your body. Damage to the nerves makes it hard for them to transmit signals. As a result, the muscles have trouble
responding to the brain.

  • Weakness or tingling feeling in the legs that might spread to the upper body
  • Paralysis in severe cases

Symptoms often progress relatively quickly, over a period of days or weeks, and often occur on both sides of the body.

Hashimoto’s (hah-shee-MOH-toh-Hohz) disease 

(underactive thyroid) A disease that causes the thyroid to not make enough thyroid hormone.

  • Fatigue
  • Weakness
  • Weight gain
  • Sensitivity to cold
  • Muscle aches and stiff joints
  • Facial swelling
  • Constipation

Hemolytic anemia (HEE-moh-lit-ihk uh-NEE-mee-uh)

The immune system destroys the red blood cells. Yet the body can’t make new red blood cells fast enough to meet the body’s needs. As a result, your body does not get the oxygen it needs to function well, and your
heart must work harder to move oxygen-rich blood throughout the body.

  • Fatigue
  • Shortness of breath
  • Dizziness
  • Headache
  • Cold hands or feet
  • Paleness
  • Yellowish skin or whites of eyes
  • Heart problems, including heart failure

Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (id-ee-oh-PATH-ihk-throm-boh-seye-toh-PEE-nik PUR-pur-uh) (ITP)

A disease in which the immune system destroys blood platelets, which are needed for blood to clot.

  • Very heavy menstrual period
  • Tiny purple or red dots on the skin   that might look like a rash.
  • Easy bruising
  • Nosebleed or bleeding in the mouth

Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD)

A disease that causes chronic inflammation of the digestive tract. Crohn’s (krohnz) disease and ulcerative colitis (UHL-sur-uh-tiv koh-LEYE-tuhss) are the most common forms of IBD.

  • Abdominal pain
  • Diarrhea, which may be bloody

Some people also have:

  • Rectal bleeding
  • Fever
  • Weight loss
  • Fatigue
  • Mouth ulcers (in Crohn’s disease)
  • Painful or difficult bowel movements (in ulcerative colitis)

Inflammatory myopathies (meye-OP-uh-theez)

A group of diseases that involve muscle inflammation and muscle weakness. Polymyositis (pol-ee-meye-uh-SYT-uhss) and dermatomyositis (dur-muh-toh-meye-uh-SYT-uhss) are 2 types more common in women than men.

  • Slow but progressive muscle weakness beginning in the muscles closest to the trunk of the body. Polymyositis affects muscles involved with making movement       on both sides of the body. With       dermatomyositis, a skin rash comes before or at the same time as muscle weakness.

May also have:

  • Fatigue after walking or standing
  • Tripping or falling
  • Difficulty swallowing or breathing

Multiple sclerosis (MUHL-tip-uhl sklur-OH-suhss) (MS)

A disease in which the immune system attacks the protective coating around the nerves. The damage affects the brain and spinal cord.

  • Weakness and trouble with coordination, balance, speaking, and walking
  • Paralysis
  • Tremors
  • Numbness and tingling feeling in arms, legs, hands, and feet
  • Symptoms vary because the location and extent of each attack vary

Myasthenia gravis (meye-uhss-THEEN-ee-uh GRAV-uhss) (MG)

A disease in which the immune system attacks the nerves and muscles throughout the body.

  • Double vision, trouble keeping a steady gaze, and drooping eyelids
  • Trouble swallowing, with frequent gagging or choking
  • Weakness or paralysis
  • Muscles that
    work better after rest
  • Drooping head
  • Trouble climbing stairs or lifting things
  • Trouble talking

Primary biliary cirrhosis (BIL-ee-air-ee sur-ROH-suhss)

The immune system slowly destroys the liver’s bile ducts. Bile is a substance made in the liver. It travels through the bile ducts to help with digestion. When the ducts are destroyed, the bile builds up in the liver and hurts it. The damage causes the liver to harden and scar, and eventually stop working.

  • Fatigue
  • Itchy skin
  • Dry eyes and
    mouth
  • Yellowing of skin and whites of eyes

Psoriasis (suh-REYE-uh-suhss)

A disease that causes new skin cells that grow deep in your skin to rise too fast and pile up on the skin surface.

  • Thick red patches, covered with scales, usually appearing on the head, elbows, and knees
  • Itching and pain, which can make it hard to sleep, walk, and care for yourself

May have:

  • A form of arthritis that often affects the joints and the ends of the fingers and toes. Back pain can occur if the spine is involved.

Rheumatoid arthritis (ROO-muh-toid ar-THREYE-tuhss)

A disease in which the immune system attacks the lining of the joints throughout the body.

  • Painful, stiff, swollen, and deformed joints
  • Reduced movement and function

May have:

  • Fatigue
  • Fever
  • Weight loss
  • Eye inflammation
  • Lung disease
  • Lumps of tissue under the skin, often the elbows
  • Amemia

Scleroderma (sklair-oh-DUR-muh)

A disease causing abnormal growth of connective tissue in the skin and blood vessels.

  • Fingers and toes that turn white, red, or blue in response to heat and cold
  • Pain, stiffness, and swelling of fingers and joints
  • Thickening of the skin
  • Skin that looks shiny on the hands and forearm
  • Tight and mask-like facial skin
  • Sores on the fingers or toes
  • Trouble swallowing
  • Weight loss
  • Diarrhea or constipation
  • Shortness of breath

Sjögren’s (SHOH-grins) syndrome

A disease in which the immune system targets the glands that make moisture, such as tears and saliva.

  • Dry eyes or eyes that itch
  • Dryness of the mouth, which can cause sores
  • Trouble swallowing
  • Loss of sense of taste
  • Severe dental cavities
  • Hoarse voice
  • Fatigue
  • Joint swelling or pain
  • Swollen glands
  • Cloudy eyes

Systemic lupus erythematosus (LOO-puhss ur-ih-thee-muh-TOH-suhss)

A disease that can damage the joints, skin, kidneys, heart, lungs, and other parts of the body. Also called SLE or lupus.

  • Fever
  • Weight loss
  • Hair loss
  • Mouth sores
  • Fatigue
  • “Butterfly” rash across the nose and cheeks
  • Rashes on other parts of the body
  • Painful or swollen joints and muscle pain
  • Sensitivity to the sun
  • Chest pain
  • Headache, dizziness, seizure, memory problems, or change in behavior

Vitiligo (vit-ihl-EYE-goh)

The immune system destroys the cells that give your skin its color. It also can affect the tissue inside your mouth and nose.

  • White patches on areas exposed to the sun, or on armpits, genitals, and rectum
  • Hair turns gray early
  • Loss of color inside your mouth

 

 

Are chronic fatigue syndrome and fibromyalgia autoimmune diseases?

Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) and fibromyalgia (feye-broh-meye-AL-juh) (FM) are not autoimmune diseases. But they often have symptoms of some autoimmune disease, like being
tired all the time and pain.

  • CFS can cause you to be very tired, have trouble concentrating, feel weak, and have muscle pain. Symptoms of CFS come and go. The cause of CFS is not known.
  • FM is a disorder in which pain or tenderness is felt in multiple places all over the body. These   “tender points” are located on the neck, shoulders, back, hips, arms, and legs and are painful when pressure is applied to them. Other symptoms include fatigue, trouble sleeping and morning stiffness. FM mainly occurs in women of childbearing age. But children, the elderly, and men are sometimes can also get it. The cause is not known.

How do I find out if I have an autoimmune disease?

Getting a diagnosis can be a long and stressful process. Although each autoimmune disease is           unique, many share some of the same symptoms. And many symptoms of autoimmune diseases   are the same for other types of health problems too. This makes it hard for doctors to find out if     you really have an autoimmune disease, and which one it might be. But if you are having symptoms that bother you, it’s important to find the cause. Don’t give up if you’re not getting any answers.     You can take these steps to help find out the cause of your symptoms:

  • Write down a complete family history that includes extended family and share it with             your doctor.
  • Record any symptoms you have, even if they seem unrelated, and share it with your doctor.
  • See a specialist who has experience dealing with your most major symptom. For instance, if you have symptoms of inflammatory bowel disease, start with a gastroenterologist. Ask       your regular doctor, friends, and others for suggestions.
  • Get a second, third or fourth opinion if need be. If your doctor doesn’t take your symptoms seriously or tells you they are stress-related or in your head, see another doctor.

What types of doctors treat autoimmune diseases?

Juggling your health care needs among many doctors and specialists can be hard. But specialists,     along with your main doctor, may be helpful in managing some symptoms of your autoimmune     disease. If you see a specialist, make sure you have a supportive main doctor to help you. Often,     your family doctor may help you coordinate care if you need to see one or more specialists. Here     are some specialists who treat autoimmune diseases:

  • Nephrologist. A doctor who treats kidney problems, such as inflamed kidneys caused by     lupus. Kidneys are organs that clean the blood and produce urine.
  • Rheumatologist. A doctor who treats arthritis and other rheumatic diseases, such as         scleroderma and lupus.
  • Endocrinologist. A doctor who treats gland and hormone problems, such as diabetes           and thyroid disease.
  • Neurologist. A doctor who treats nerve problems, such as multiple sclerosis and                 myasthenia gravis.
  • Hematologist. A doctor who treats diseases that affect blood, such as some forms             of anemia.
  • Gastroenterologist. A doctor who treats problems with the digestive system, such             as inflammatory bowel disease.
  • Dermatologist. A doctor who treats diseases that affect the skin, hair, and nails,                 such as psoriasis and lupus.
  • Physical therapist. A health care worker who uses proper types of physical activity               to help patients with stiffness, weakness, and restricted body movement.
  • Occupational therapist. A health care worker who can find ways to make activities               of daily living easier for you, despite your pain and other health problems. This could               be teaching you new ways of doing things or how to use special devices. Or suggesting           changes to make in your home or workplace.
  • Speech therapist. A health care worker who can help people with speech problems from       illness such as multiple sclerosis.
  • Audiologist. A health care worker who can help people with hearing problems, including         inner ear damage from autoimmune diseases.
  • Vocational therapist. A health care worker who offers job training for people who cannot     do their current jobs because of their illness or other health problems. You can find this type   of person through both public and private agencies.
  • Counselor for emotional support. A health care worker who is specially trained to help you to find ways to cope with your illness. You can work through your feelings of anger, fear,     denial, and frustration.

Are there medicines to treat autoimmune diseases?

There are many types of medicines used to treat autoimmune diseases. The type of medicine           you need depends on which disease you have, how severe it is, and your symptoms. Treatment     can do the following:

  • Relieve symptoms. Some people can use over-the-counter drugs for mild symptoms,         like aspirin and ibuprofen for mild pain. Others with more severe symptoms may need             prescription drugs to help relieve symptoms such as pain, swelling, depression, anxiety,           sleep problems, fatigue, or rashes. For others, treatment may be as involved as having surgery.
  • Replace vital substances the body can no longer make on its own. Some autoimmune diseases, like diabetes and thyroid disease, can affect the body’s ability to make substances it needs to function. With diabetes, insulin injections are needed to regulate blood sugar.             Thyroid hormone replacement restores thyroid hormone levels in people with underactive thyroid.
  • Suppress the immune system. Some drugs can suppress immune system activity. These drugs can help control the disease process and preserve organ function. For instance, these drugs are used to control inflammation in affected kidneys in people with lupus to keep the kidneys working. Medicines used to suppress inflammation include chemotherapy given at lower doses than for cancer treatment and drugs used in patients who have had an organ transplant to protect against rejection. A class of drugs called anti-TNF medications blocks
    inflammation in some forms of autoimmune arthritis and psoriasis.

New treatments for autoimmune diseases are being studied all the time.

Are there alternative treatments that can help?

Many people try some form of complimentary and alternative medicine (CAM) at some point in       their lives. Some examples of CAM are herbal products, chiropractic, acupuncture and hynosis. If you have an autoimmune disease, you might wonder if CAM therapies can help some of your         symptoms. This is hard to know. Studies on CAM therapies are limited. Also, some CAM products     can cause health problems or interfere with how the medicines you might need work. If you want     to try a CAM treatment, be sure to discuss it with your doctor. Your doctor can tell you about the     possible benefits and risks of trying CAM.

I want to have a baby. Does having an autoimmune disease affect
pregnancy?

Women with autoimmune diseases can safely have children. But there could be some risks for the     mother or baby, depending on the disease and how severe it is. For instance, pregnant women         with lupus have a higher risk of preterm birth and stillbirth. Pregnant women with myasthenia         gravis (MG) might have symptoms that lead to trouble breathing during pregnancy. For some           women, symptoms tend to improve during pregnancy, while others find their symptoms tend to       flare up. Also, some medicines used to treat autoimmune diseases might not be safe to use during pregnancy.

If you want to have a baby, talk to your doctor before you start trying to get pregnant. Your         doctor might suggest that you wait until your disease is in remission or suggest a change in               medicines before you start trying. You also might need to see a doctor who cares for women         with high-risk pregnancies.

Some women with autoimmune diseases may have problems getting pregnant. This can happen for many reasons. Tests can tell if fertility problems are caused by an autoimmune disease or an unrelated reason. Fertility treatments are able to help some women with autoimmune disease       become pregnant.

How can I manage my life now that I have an autoimmune disease?

Although most autoimmune diseases don’t go away, you can treat your symptoms and learn to manage your disease, so you can enjoy life! Women with autoimmune diseases lead full, active         lives. Your life goals should not have to change. It is important, though, to see a doctor who            specializes in these types of diseases, follow your treatment plan, and adopt a healthy lifestyle.

How can I deal with flares?

Flares are the sudden and severe onset of symptoms. You might notice that certain triggers, such as stress or being out in the sun, cause your symptoms to flare. Knowing your triggers, following your treatment plan, and seeing your doctor regularly can help you to prevent flares or keep them from becoming severe. If you suspect a flare is coming, call your doctor. Don’t try a “cure” you heard about from a friend or relative.

What are some things I can do to feel better?

If you are living with an autoimmune disease, there are things you can do each day to feel better:

  • Eat healthy, well-balanced meals. Make sure to include fruits and vegetables, whole grains, fat-free or low-fat milk products, and lean sources of protein. Limit saturated fat, trans fat,     cholesterol, salt, and added sugars. If you follow a healthy eating plan, you will get the nutrients you need from food.
  • Get regular physical activity. But be careful not to overdo it. Talk with your doctor about what types of physical activity you can do. A gradual and gentle exercise program often works well for people with long-lasting muscle and joint pain. Some types of yoga or tai
    chi exercises may be helpful.
  • Get enough rest. Rest allows your body tissues and joints the time they need to repair. Sleeping is a great way you can help both your body and mind. If you don’t get enough
    sleep, your stress level and your symptoms could get worse. You also can’t fight off sickness
    as well when you sleep poorly. When you are well-rested, you can tackle your problems better and lower your risk for illness. Most people need at least 7 to 9 hours of sleep each day to feel well-rested.
  • Reduce stress. Stress and anxiety can trigger symptoms to flare up with some autoimmune diseases. So finding ways to simplify your life and cope with daily stressors will help you to feel your best. Meditation, self-hypnosis, and guided imagery, are simple relaxation techniques that might help you to reduce stress, lessen your pain, and deal with other aspects of living with your disease. You can learn to do these through self-help books, tapes, or with the help of an instructor. Joining a support group or talking with a counselor might also help you to
    manage your stress and cope with your disease.
You have some power to lessen your pain! Try using imagery for 15 minutes, two or three times each day.

  1. Put on your favorite calming music.
  2. Lie back on your favorite chair or sofa. Or if you are at work, sit back and relax in your chair.
  3. Close your eyes.
  4. Imagine your pain or discomfort.
  5. Imagine something that confronts this pain and watch it “destroy” the pain.

More information on autoimmune diseases

For more information about autoimmune diseases, call womenshealth.gov at 800-994-9662 (TDD: 888-220-5446) or contact the following organizations:

Autoimmune diseases fact sheet was reviewed by:

Ellen Goldmuntz, M.D., Ph.D.
Medical Officer
Division of Allergy, Immunology, and Transplantation
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases
National Institutes of Health
Bethesda, MD 
Audrey S. Penn, M.D.
National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke
National Institutes of Health
Rockville, MD

Content last updated April 14, 2010.

Contents from: Womenshealth.gov
Office on Women’s Health, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
If you are looking for alternative, and perhaps controversial to some:
Natural Pain Relief for Fibromyalgia


http://naturalpainreliefforfibromyalgia.com/1549

   Disclaimer: All content contained within this website
is not intended to treat, cure or diagnose in any way. All content is commentary
or opinion and is protected under the free speech act.

2010 to
Present All
Rights Reserved

 

 

 



Welcome to Natural Pain Relief For Fibromyalgia

Fibromyalgia fact sheet

What is fibromyalgia?

Fibromyalgia (fye-bro-mye-AL-ja) is a disorder that causes aches and pain all over the body. People with fibromyalgia also have “tender points” throughout their bodies. Tender points are specific places on the neck, shoulders, back, hips, arms, and legs that hurt when pressure is put on them.

What are the symptoms of fibromyalgia?

In addition to pain, people with fibromyalgia could also have:

  • Cognitive and memory problems (sometimes called “fibro fog”)
  • Trouble sleeping
  • Morning stiffness
  • Headaches
  • Irritable bowel syndrome
  • Painful menstrual periods
  • Numbness or tingling of hands and feet
  • Restless legs syndrome
  • Temperature sensitivity
  • Sensitivity to loud noises or bright lights

How common is fibromyalgia? Who is mainly affected?

Fibromyalgia affects as many as 5 million Americans ages 18 and older. Most people with fibromyalgia are women (about 80 – 90 percent). However, men and children also can have the disorder. Most people are diagnosed during middle age.

Fibromyalgia can occur by itself, but people with certain other diseases, such
as rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, and other types of arthritis, may be more likely to who have it. Individuals have a close relative with fibromyalgia are more likely to develop it themselves.

What causes fibromyalgia?

The causes of fibromyalgia are not known. Researchers think a number of factors might be involved. Fibromyalgia can occur on its own, but has also been linked to:

  • Having a family history of fibromyalgia
  • Being exposed to stressful or traumatic events, such as
    • Car accidents
    • Injuries to the body caused by
      performing the same action over and over again (called “repetitive”
      injuries)
    • Infections or illnesses
    • Being sent to war

How is fibromyalgia diagnosed?

People with fibromyalgia often see many doctors before being diagnosed. One reason for this may be that pain and fatigue, the main symptoms of fibromyalgia, also are symptoms of many other conditions. Therefore, doctors often must rule out other possible causes of these symptoms before diagnosing fibromyalgia. Fibromyalgia cannot be found by a lab test.

A doctor who knows about fibromyalgia, however, can make a diagnosis based upon two criteria:

  1. A history of widespread pain lasting more than 3 months. Pain must be present in both the right and left sides of the body as well as above and below the waist.
  2. Presence of tender points. The body has 18 sites that are possible tender points. For fibromyalgia diagnosis a person must have 11 or more tender points. For a point to be
    “tender,” the patient must feel pain when pressure is put on the site. People who have fibromyalgia may feel pain at other sites, too, but those 18 sites on the body are used for diagnosis.

Your doctor may try to rule out other causes of your pain and fatigue. Testing for some of these things may make sense to you. For instance, you may find it reasonable that your doctor wants to rule out rheumatoid arthritis, since that disease also causes pain. Testing for other conditions — such as lupus, multiple sclerosis, or sleep apnea — may make less lupus, sense to you. But fibromyalgia can mimic or even overlap many other conditions. Talk with your doctor. He or she can help you understand what each test is for and how each test is part of making a final diagnosis

How is fibromyalgia treated?

Fibromyalgia can be hard to treat. It’s important to find a doctor who has treated others with fibromyalgia. Many family doctors, general internists, or rheumatologists can treat fibromyalgia. Rheumatologists are doctors who treat arthritis and other conditions that affect the joints and soft tissues.

Treatment often requires a team approach. The team may include your doctor, a physical therapist, and possibly other health care providers. A pain or rheumatology clinic can be a good place to get treatment. Treatment for fibromyalgia may include the following:

  • Pain management. Three medicines have been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to treat fibromyalgia. These are pregabalin (Lyrica), duloxetine (Cymbalta), and milnacipran (Savella). Other medications are being developed and may
    also receive FDA approval in the future. Your doctor may also suggest non-narcotic pain relievers, low-dose antidepressants, or other classes of medications that might help improve certain symptoms.
  • Sleep management. Getting the right amount of sleep at night may help improve your symptoms. Here are tips for good sleep:
    • Keep regular sleep habits. Try to get to bed at the same time and get up at the same time every day — even on weekends and vacations.
    • Avoid caffeine and alcohol in the late afternoon and evening.
    • Time your exercise. Regular daytime exercise can improve nighttime sleep. But avoid exercising within 3 hours of bedtime, which can be stimulating, keeping you awake.
    • Avoid daytime naps. Sleeping in the afternoon can interfere with nighttime sleep. If you feel you cannot get by without a nap, set an alarm for 1 hour. When it goes off, get up and start moving.
    • Reserve your bed for sleeping. Watching the late news, reading a suspense novel, or working on your laptop in bed can stimulate you, making it hard to sleep.
    • Keep your bedroom dark, quiet, and cool.
    • Avoid liquids and spicy meals before bed. Heartburn and late-night trips to the bathroom do not lead to good sleep.
    • Wind down before bed. Avoid working right up to bedtime. Do relaxing activities, such as listening to soft music or taking a warm bath, that get you ready to sleep. (A warm bath also may soothe aching muscles.)
  • Psychological support. Living with a chronic condition can be hard on you. If you have fibromyalgia, find a support group. Counseling sessions with a trained counselor may improve
    your understanding of your illness.
  • Other treatments. Complementary therapies may help you. Talk to your physician before trying any alternative treatments. These include:
    • Physical therapy
    • Massage
    • Myofascial release therapy
    • Water therapy
    • Light aerobics
    • Acupressure
    • Applying heat or cold
    • Acupuncture
    • Yoga
    • Relaxation exercises
    • Breathing techniques
    • Aromatherapy
    • Cognitive therapy
    • Biofeedback
    • Herbs
    • Nutritional supplements
    • Osteopathic or chiropractic manipulation

What can I do to try to feel better?

Besides taking medicine prescribed by your doctor, there are many things you can do to lessen the impact of fibromyalgia on your life. These include:

  • Getting enough sleep. Getting enough sleep and the right kind of sleep can help ease the pain and fatigue of fibromyalgia. Most adults need seven to eight hours of “restorative”
    sleep per night. Restorative sleep leaves you feeling well-rested and ready for your day to start when you wake up. It is hard for people with fibromyalgia to get a good night’s sleep. It is important to discuss any sleep problems with your doctor, who can recommend treatment for them.
  • Exercising. Although pain and fatigue may make exercise and daily activities difficult, it is
    crucial to be as physically active as possible. Research has repeatedly shown that regular exercise is one of the most effective treatments for fibromyalgia. People who have too much pain or fatigue to do hard exercise should just begin to move more and become more active in routine daily activities. Then they can begin with walking (or other gentle exercise) and
    build their endurance and intensity slowly.
  • Making changes at work. Most people with fibromyalgia continue to work, but they may have to make big changes to do so. For example, some people cut down the number of hours they work, switch to a less demanding job, or adapt a current job. If you face
    obstacles at work, such as an uncomfortable desk chair that leaves your back aching or difficulty lifting heavy boxes or files, your employer may make changes that will enable you to keep your job. An occupational therapist can help you design a more comfortable workstation or find more efficient and less painful ways to lift. A number of federal laws protect the rights of people with disabilities.
  • Eating well. Although some people with fibromyalgia report feeling better when they eat or avoid certain foods, no specific diet has been proven to influence fibromyalgia. Of course, it is important to have a healthy, balanced diet. Not only will proper nutrition give you more energy and make you generally feel better, it will also help you avoid other health problems.

Will fibromyalgia get better with time?

Fibromyalgia is a chronic condition, meaning it lasts a long time — possibly a lifetime. However, it may be comforting to know that fibromyalgia is not a progressive disease. It is never fatal, and it will not cause damage to the joints, muscles, or internal organs. In many people, the condition does improve over time.

What is the difference between fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue
syndrome?

Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) and fibromyalgia are alike in many ways. In fact, it is not uncommon for a person to have both fibromyalgia and CFS. Some experts believe that fibromyalgia and CFS are in fact the same disorder, but expressed in slightly different ways. Both CFS and fibromyalgia have pain and fatigue as symptoms.

The main symptom of CFS is extreme tiredness. CFS often begins after having flu-like symptoms. But people with CFS do not have the tender points that people with fibromyalgia have. To be diagnosed with CFS, a person must have:

  1. Extreme fatigue for at least 6 months that cannot be explained by medical tests and
  2. At least 4 or more of the following symptoms:
    • Forgetting things or having a hard time focusing
    • Feeling tired even after sleeping
    • Muscle pain or aches
    • Pain or aches in joints without swelling or redness
    • Feeling discomfort or “out-of-sorts” for more than 24 hours after being active
    • Headaches of a new type, pattern, or strength
    • Tender lymph nodes in the neck or under the arm
    • Sore throat

What if I can’t work because of fibromyalgia?

Many experts in fibromyalgia do not suggest patients go on disability. These experts have found that if patients stop working, they:

  • Stop moving as much during the day
  • Lose contact with co-workers
  • Lose a “sense of purpose” in life

All of these things can make a patient feel more alone and depressed. These three things tend to make fibromyalgia symptoms worse. Deciding to go on disability is a hard choice that you should talk about with your doctor or nurse.

However, if you cannot work because of your fibromyalgia, contact the Social Security Administration for help with disability benefits. You may qualify for disability benefits through your employer or the Federal Government. Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) and Supplemental Security Insurance (SSI) are the largest Federal programs providing financial assistance to people with disabilities. Although the medical requirements for eligibility are the same under the two programs, the way they are funded is different. SSDI is paid by Social Security taxes, and those who qualify for assistance receive benefits based on how much they have paid into the system. SSI is funded by general tax revenues, and those who qualify receive payments based on financial need. For information about the SSDI and SSI programs, contact the Social Security Administration at
800-772-1213.

What research is being done on fibromyalgia?

The National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases sponsors research to help understand fibromyalgia and find better ways to diagnose, treat, and prevent it. Researchers are studying:

  • Why people with fibromyalgia feel a lot of pain
  • How exercise can help patients withfibromyalgia
  • Medicines and behavioral treatments

More information on fibromyalgia

For more information about fibromyalgia, call womenshealth.gov at 800-994-9662 (TDD:
888-220-5446) or contact the following organizations:

Information provided by the Womenshealth.gov

Office on Women’s Health, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Fibromyalgia fact sheet was reviewed by:

Daniel Clauw, M.D. 

Director of the Chronic Pain and Fatigue Research Center

University of Michigan

Content last updated June 29, 2010.

 

For an alternative view and drug free approach to pain relief for Fibromyalgia:


http://naturalpainreliefforfibromyalgia.com/1549

   Disclaimer:
All content contained within this website is not intended to treat, cure or
diagnose in any way. All content is commentary or opinion and is protected under
the free speech act.

2011 All
Rights Reserved

 

 

 



Welcome to Natural Pain Relief For Fibromyalgia

Greatest Health Secret on Earth

David Wolfe

Remember when you used to get outside and feel the grass between your toes? It was actually keeping you healthy.

It grounds you which is a necessity in today’s world. Get out and feel nature under your bare feet today! It can help you relieve pain naturally!

Anyone with Fibromyalgia, arthritis or any chronic illness should be grounding themselves with the earth daily to experience some pain relief.

Read more:


http://naturalpainreliefforfibromyalgia.com/1549

   Disclaimer: All content contained within this website
is not intended to treat, cure or diagnose in any way. All content is commentary
or opinion and is protected under the free speech act.

2011 All
Rights Reserved

 

 

 



Welcome to Natural Pain Relief For Fibromyalgia


A Rational Biological Source of Pain in the Skin of Patients with Fibromyalgia

A Science Breakthrough To Identifying Pain of Fibromyalgia is Real

Fibromyalgia Is Not All In Your Head, New Research Confirms

Hallelujah! Shout it from the roof tops, scientists have found a possible explanation for the pain of Fibromyalgia!!! This will give some respect back to the sufferers who have been through cynicism and disbelief!

Researchers discover a rational biological source of pain in the skin of patients with fibromyalgia.

Albany Medical Center neurologist, Dr Rice 

Pain specialist Dr. Charles EArgoffthe study primary investigator

Collaborators 

Dr. James Wymer 
also at Albany Medical College and 

Dr. James Storey 
of Upstate Clinical Research Associates in Albany, NY

Clinical research proposals were funded by Forest Laboratories and Eli Lilly. 


the AV shunts in the hand are unique in that they create a bypass of the capillary bed for the major purpose of regulating body temperature.

A Thermostat for the Skin

In humans, these types of shunts are unique to the palms of our hands and soles of our feet which work like the radiator in a car

under warm conditions, the shunts close down to force blood into the capillaries at the surface of the skin in order to radiate heat from the body, and our hands get sweaty

under cold conditions, the shunts open wide allowing blood to bypass the capillaries in order to conserve heat, and our hands get cold

According to Dr. Albrecht, the excess sensory innervations may itself explain why fibromyalgia patients typically have especially tender and painful hands.

In addition, since the sensory fibers are responsible for opening the shunts, they would become particularly active under cold conditions, which are generally very bothersome to fibromyalgia patients.

A role in regulating blood flow throughout the body

Although they are mostly limited to the hands and feet, the shunts likely have another important function which could account for the widespread deep pain, achiness, and fatigue that occurs in fibromyalgia patients.

“In addition to involvement in temperature regulation, an enormous proportion of our blood flow normally goes to our hands and feet. Far more than is needed for their metabolism” noted Dr. Rice.

– the hands and the feet act as a reservoir from which blood flow can be diverted to other tissues of the body, such as muscles when we begin to exercise. Therefore, the pathology discovered among these shunts in the hands could be interfering with blood flow to the muscles throughout the body.

this mismanaged blood flow could be the source of muscular pain and achiness, and the sense of fatigue which are thought to be due to a build-up of lactic acid and low levels of inflammation in fibromyalgia patients.

– this, in turn, could contribute to the hyperactvity in the brain

alterations of normal blood flow may underlie other fibromyalgia symptoms, such as non-restful sleep or cognitive dysfunctions.

“The data do appear to fit with other published evidence demonstrating blood flow alterations to higher brain centers and the cerebral cortex of fibromyalgia patients” Dr Rice stated.

See diagram and read the full story at:

http://www.intidyn.com/Newsroom/article-0009.html

The Science

US National Library of Medicine National institute of Health


Pain Med.
 2013
Jun;14(6):895-915. doi: 10.1111/pme.12139. Epub 2013 May 20.

Excessive Peptidergic Sensory Innervation of Cutaneous Arteriole-Venule
Shunts (AVS) in the Palmar Glabrous Skin of Fibromyalgia Patients: Implications for Widespread Deep Tissue Pain and Fatigue

Source


Integrated Tissue Dynamics, LLC, Rensselaer, New York, USA; Center for


Neuropharmacology & Neuroscience, Albany Medical College, Albany, New York


USA
.

CONCLUSIONS:

– the excessive sensory innervation to the glabrous skin AVS is a likely

source of severe pain and tenderness in the hands of FM patients

– importantly, glabrous AVS regulate blood flow to the skin in humans for

thermoregulation and tother tissues such as skeletal muscle during periods of increased metabolic demand

– therefore, blood flow dysregulation as a result of excessive innervation to AVS would likely contribute to the widespread deep pain and fatigue of FM

– SNRI compounds may provide partial therapeutic benefit by enhancing the impact of sympathetically mediated inhibitory modulation of the excess sensory innervation

Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

PMID: 23691965 

My opinioin

So there is the science that they found to confirm Fibromyalgia sufferers are having “real pain”.

Finally! Do you feel a sense of relief? I don’t. The study was funded by the drug companies and they plan to find another drug to help kill the pain.

Is this just a symptom or a result of another cause?

I want to find the reason the shunts are not working properly, how about you?

I am going to return to this statement from above: this mismanaged blood flow could be the source of muscular pain and achiness, and the sense of fatigue which are thought to be due to a build-up of lactic acid and low levels of inflammation in fibromyalgia patients

So I am going to work on reducing or eliminating high lactic acid and inflammatory foods. My new book deals with inflammatory foods so it will be a big help for anyone seeking an alternative way to dealing with your pain. It will be released soon! Stay tuned for help on how to avoid prescriptions. Because I care!

http://naturalpainreliefforfibromyalgia.com/937


http://naturalpainreliefforfibromyalgia.com/1549

   Disclaimer: All content contained within this website
is not intended to treat, cure or diagnose in any way. All content is commentary
or opinion and is protected under the free speech act.

2011 All Rights Reserved