I got digging into Harvard University website and dug into some statistics on the United States Department of Agriculture

USDA Dairy Products 2009 Summary April 2010. I was in awe how many billions of pounds of dairy is consumed!! The keyword here is “billions” of pounds. Wow! Is anyone’s colon moving in America? Oh right, there is an obesity issue isn’t there? No wonder there is so much chronic illness and disease with the hormone and antibiotics that most of this dairy is loaded with.

I am lactose intolerant so I don’t consume dairy because when I do I suffer a lot. I think there are a lot of people are the same but instead of avoiding dairy they resort to medications for diarrhea, stomach problems or over the counter stomach remedies instead of addressing diet and avoiding the causing factor.

I think the saying, “you are what you eat” is as true as “you are what you breathe, wear, absorb and what you think.” If you plug your colon with cheese and other foods like white flour products and fast foods like McDonald’s, it is going to quit functioning properly.

Here is some statistics from Harvard:

Summary

Total cheese production, excluding cottage cheeses, was 10.1 billion pounds, 2.0 percent above 2008 production. Wisconsin was the leading State with 26.0 percent of the production.

Italian varieties, with 4.18 billion pounds were 1.4 percent above 2008 production and accounted for 41.4 percent of total cheese in 2009. Mozzarella accounted for 78.2 percent of the Italian production followed by Provolone with 8.3 percent and Ricotta with 5.9 percent. Wisconsin was the leading State in Italian cheese production with 29.5 percent of the production.

American type cheese production was 4.20 billion pounds, 2.3 percent above 2008 and accounted for 41.6 percent of total cheese in 2009. Wisconsin was the leading State in American type cheese production with 20.2 percent of the production.

Butter production in the United States during 2009 totaled 1.57 billion pounds, 4.3 percent below 2008. California was the leading State in butter production and accounted for 33.1 percent of the production.

Dry milk powders: (2009 U.S. production, comparisons with 2008)

Nonfat dry milk, human — 1.51 billion pounds, down 0.7 percent.

Skim milk powders — 222 million pounds, down 40.6 percent.

Whey products: (2009 U.S. production, comparisons with 2008)

Dry whey, total — 1.00 billion pounds, down 7.5 percent.

Lactose, human and animal — 723 million pounds, down 3.1 percent.

Whey protein concentrate, total — 415 million pounds, down 6.3 percent.

Frozen products: (2009 U.S. production, comparisons with 2008)

Ice cream, Regular (total) — 920 million gallons, down 1.1 percent.

Ice cream, Lowfat (total) — 381 million gallons, down 0.6 percent.

Sherbet (total) — 53.1 million gallons, down 8.0 percent.

Frozen Yogurt (total) — 74.4 million gallons, down 5.3 percent.

That’s a lot of dairy! With most of it being dessert or treats, it is also high in sugar as well aspartame, food coloring, chemicals, preservatives, msg and additives. There is also antibiotics and steroids that the cattle are getting and the pesticides they are and they could be eating genetically modified food. It contributes to heart disease, obesity and diabetes as well. It is a chaotic chain of harmful chemicals in our food chain. We need pure, natural, organic food!

Albert Einstein

In matters of truth and justice, there is no difference between large and small problems, for issues concerning the treatment of people are all the same.

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